Sports over the years

Updated: Apr 1

Our award-winning coverage of fitness gear, apparel, trends and events that promote an active lifestyle inspires you to make fitness part of your daily life, whether it's watching sports, exercising or having a play date. New York Yankees owners Blake Griffin and Michael Jordan have donated money to support the National Football League Players Association (NFLPA).


Since the development of modern sport began in England in the late seventeenth century, it is fitting that the concept of "sports record" first appeared there, too. While traditional boxing flourished in the 18th century, the first formal rules for boxing were formulated in 1743 by boxer and entrepreneur Jack Broughton. In the 1790s, brawls and bullfights condemned and driven underground by the Puritans gave way to games such as cricket, which gave rise to the Marylebone Cricket Club, founded in 1887 by Sir John Merton, one of England's most famous cricketers. Although traditional sports such as boxing have flourished in Britain since the 16th century, particularly in London and the West Indies, it was not until the 1800s that boxing entrepreneur Jack B Roughton formulated rules to streamline and regulate the sport. Sources: 0

By the Renaissance, sport had become completely secular, and the competitive aspects of sport were overshadowed by other forms of competition, such as boxing and wrestling, which, according to Amo D'Amo, a professor of sports history at the University of California, Berkeley, were considered the classic models.

Indeed, the elite of the 15th and 16th centuries preferred to dance to the sport, and under the influence of the ballet that developed in France at that time, choreographers trained horses to perform graceful movements and win races.

Horse racing was explicitly authorized by the Prophet Mohammed, and geography dictated that men should race camels as well as horses. Although the war was fought with a bow and arrow, the archery competitions continued to serve as a demonstration of willing skills. Fencing, "published in 1628, regarded the activity as an art form rather than a fight.

Berber bat and ball contests, the configuration of which bears an uncanny resemblance to baseball in its configuration. Among the many games in North Africa is kurt om el mahag isbebe, or "kurt - om - el - Mahag," or bat and ball competition, a Berber baseball game.

Chinese Wushu military capabilities, including armed and unarmed combat, were highly developed in the 3rd century BC. Much less well known in the West is varma adi, "hitting at crucial points," a variant of the same game. The Chinese are very familiar with the game kurt om el mahag isbebe, a competition of Berber bats and balls.

In Nuba, South Sudan, elaborately decorated and carefully trained male bodies were a primary source of male status and prestige.

The Tutsi and Hutu of Rwanda were among the people who organized a competition for women at the beginning of the 20th century for the title of the world's best female athlete.

For various peoples in sub-Saharan Africa, wrestling was a way to celebrate and symbolically promote human fertility and fertility. The hard-fought contests convinced the gods to grant abundant harvests of corn, corn, and sweet potatoes. In 1630 BC, there were 406 pairs of wrestlers who demonstrated their skills in a wrestling match between the tribesmen of the Igbo people in Nigeria, the Niger Delta. This painting was found on a Middle Kingdom tomb, and in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, an Igbo tribesman took part in wrestling in front of a large crowd in their ancestral village in an ancient village in the northern state of Borno.

Since Minoan scripture still puzzles scholars, it is uncertain whether the images of Cretan boys and girls testing their acrobatic skills are depicted as sports or religious rituals. However, secular and religious motifs mixed in the first comprehensive sports reports in history, which were found in Greece, Turkey, and Egypt in the late 19th and early 20th centuries BC. The presence of wrestling in ancient Greece, where the sport gained unprecedented popularity among ancient Greeks and Egyptians, as well as in Egypt, suggests that the tricks of the Cretans may have been both a sport and a ritual, according to a recent study by Oxford University.

The 2nd-century traveler Pausanias wrote of a race of girls in Olympia, and the Olympic Games excluded even the spectators of the priestess Demeter. The event in honor of Hera was of minor importance, but although the Greeks were dedicated to gyms and there were no, wrestling was considered appropriate for the community.


16 views